Science and the media

Science and the media

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The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has recently published Science and the media, a document edited by Donald Kennedy and Geneva Overholser that collects nine essays analysing the realtionships between science and society and the role of media as link between them.

How do we enrich Americans’ engagement with science and technology? That is the quest that brought scientists, journalists, and leaders of science institutions together at a series of workshops organized by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and supported by the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands.

Download the document in PDF

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Finding the right expert

Finding the right expert

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The CJR journalist Curtis Brainard, wrote yesterday about the controversy created by a PNAS paper entitled «Expert credibility in climate change«. It analises the expertise of climate change scinetists and skeptics and states that «the relative climate expertise and scientific prominence of the researchers unconvinced of [anthropogenic global warming] are substantially below that of the convinced researchers». Curtis Brainard discusses in his article the impact of paper conclusions on climatic journalism.

Read the full Brainard’s article

Read the summary of the scientific paper in PNAS web site

The Scopes monkey trial, 85 years later

The Scopes monkey trial, 85 years later

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John Thomas ScopesThe man in the picture is John Thomas Scopes. He was a teacher in Dayton (Tennessee, USA) who in 1925 was brought to court for teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution. At that time, teaching evolution in Tennessee meant a violation of the Butler Act, a law prohibiting it in that State. The charge led to the trial formally known as The State of Tennessee vs. Scopes (popularly, the Scopes monkey trial), a milestone in the struggle of creationism followers to recognize their «religion» as a scientific truth. It attracted the media attention (read, for example, a chronicle of 1925) and inspired the play Inherit the wind (read the review of its release), and various film and television versions. In fact, 85 years later, the trial is still a current issue and some media talk about it.

A look into the future that never was

A look into the future that never was

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In 2007, Matt Novak, a collector self-defined as a retro-futurist, created the blog Paleo-Future, a look into the future that never was.  Since then, Novak has published nearly 700 posts on inventions, ideas, and speculations from the past that looked towards the future.

The blog collects hundreds of resources: articles, books, videos, commercials, post-cards, comics… And all of them are well classified and tagged. Paleo-Future is an interesting (and often hilarious) document that allows to see how social futuristic expectations -in particular, in terms of science and technology- have evolved since 1870 to the 90’s decade of the last century. Highly recommended!