Is the society capable of making decisions in science and technology?

Is the society capable of making decisions in science and technology?

– No.

That was the majority response among the 15 researchers who attended the third version of the workshop “How to make my research more responsible? Exploring the RRI ” that was carried out in Solar Laboratory of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

For those attending the course, responsibility in science does not imply giving decision-making capacity to the non-expert public because “lack of knowledge”. Instead, they believe that the concept is much more related to the integrity of the research and to follow professional ethics.

 

With these first reflections, the participants embarked on an exploration of the RRI through participatory exercises and role-playing games, adapted from the material produced by the HEIRRI project. Thus, the importance of reflecting on the future impacts of research and technological development and asking for the opinion of society-without this determining decision-making-arose. In addition, the participants emphasized scientific education as the central axis to change this situation.

 

The workshop, given by Luisa Barbosa of the Studies Center on Science, Communication and Society of the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), is part of the training program of the European project GRECO, in which UPF participates together with institutions from five European countries and a Latin American country.

 

GRECO seeks to put Open Science into practice through a solar energy research project and wants to demonstrate that greater social support leads to an increase in the use and integration of innovative products in this field. Thus, based on the principles of RRI and citizen participation, GRECO proposes solutions to increase the useful life of the technology, reduce its costs with higher performance and bring innovations in agriculture and architecture. The project is funded by the Horizon 2020 program of the European Union (Grant 787289).

 

  

Introductory course to the RRI in Naples

Introductory course to the RRI in Naples

On May 9 Carolina Llorente taught an introductory course to the RRI in Naples. The course was taught on the first day of the 7th International Symposium on Sensor Science and lasted 1 hour and a half. A total of 20 people participated: 10 engineers and 10 doctors.

 

The participants were engaged in biomedical research using sensors. These sensors are used to tele-monitor people with certain diseases to possible non-invasive diagnoses. The participants were very interested in the importance of the multidisciplinary teams in research on bioengineering issues and how and what strategies could be used to incorporate the visions, needs and expectations of the patients.

 

One participant of the course shared a very interesting reflection: “We engineers are trained to solve problems, we have a very practical and very decisive vision of things, which is why I think it can be very useful to have meetings with doctors and patients from the beginning to take into account all physical limitations or whatever nature, it may be even more stimulating for us to have a general and complete view of the problem.

Open call: STRENGTHEN CITIZENSHIP, PROMOTE SOLAR ENERGY

Open call: STRENGTHEN CITIZENSHIP, PROMOTE SOLAR ENERGY

The GRECO project promotes cooperation between citizens and scientists. Therefore, with this call, we invite all citizens to take advantage of their creativity and collective intelligence to give ideas on how to include citizens in solar energy research.

Are you interested in solar energy? Do you have novel and exciting ideas about how scientists can improve research and make it more inclusive? Then participate in our international competition!

For five days, your challenge will be to work with a team to analyze the comments of 50 scientists on how citizen-centered research could be. Afterwards, they should elaborate a practical proposal of two pages in which they describe their ideas.

Participants will receive the complete list of comments, indications and evaluation criteria of the proposals at the opening ceremony of the contest on May 17, 2019.

Pay attention to the calendar:

 

Do not miss the opportunity to participate and win up to 1,700 euros.

Registration closes on May 15!

The detailed information and the regulatory bases of the contest are available on the Web.

 

Additional Information:

GRECO seeks to put Open Science into practice through a solar energy research project. GRECO wants to demonstrate that greater social support leads to an increase in the use and integration of innovative products in this field. Thus, based on the principles of RRI and citizen participation, GRECO proposes solutions to increase the useful life of the technology, reduce its costs with higher performance and bring innovations in agriculture and architecture. The project is funded by the Horizon 2020 program of the European Union (Grant 787289).

 

  

Responsible research crosses the ocean to become global

Responsible research crosses the ocean to become global

What does it mean to be responsible in science and innovation? In Europe and the United States, each year it is more common to find public calls that include in their evaluation criteria the concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). However, many of the efforts to define and implement the concept have focused on these two areas.

Therefore, the Center for Studies in Science, Communication and Society of the Pompeu Fabra University as part of the GRECO project has focused on discussing this concept in other regions of the world, seeking to enrich it and adapt it to different social contexts. Thus, in the first week of April, a three-day intensive course entitled <<Considering Responsibility in Research and Innovation>> took place at the prestigious University of Sao Paulo (USP), at the Institute of Energy and Environment (IEE USP).

In this course, the participants explored how to make research projects, their processes and results more responsible, and to become familiar with the definitions, keys and dimensions of that concept. The dynamics were based mainly on practical and group work, in which the participants reflected on the RRI. Their deliberation, as well as the appropriate literature and the use of case studies, guided their work to co-create a research proposal that considered responsibility in all its forms, from open science, gender equality and inclusion to the ethics and anticipation, among others.

The course also featured some plenary sessions. Gema Revuelta, director of the center, and Luisa Barbosa, associate researcher, introduced the definition and dimensions of the concept, as well as outstanding examples in which it has been tried to put into practice. In addition, as a local representative, there was the participation of Professor Ana Paula Tavares Magalhães Tacconi, a doctor in history and advisor to the USP’s research vice-rectory, who addressed the current situation of the university in matters of open and ethical science.

 

At the end of the course, 16 researchers, laboratory technicians, teachers and administrators received their certification and reported their interest in implementing RRI practices in their professional field. In addition, when asked about key concepts associated with the word “responsibility”, the participants covered most of the aspects identified by the RRI experts.

 

 

With this step, the GRECO project, in which Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) participates along with institutions from five European countries and one Latin American country, continues the line of training that has already been in Spain and Germany. Our next destination will be Bulgaria.

 

Thus, GRECO seeks to put Open Science into practice through a solar energy research project. GRECO wants to demonstrate that greater social support leads to an increase in the use and integration of innovation products in this field. Thus, based on the principles of the RRI and citizen participation, GRECO proposes solutions to increase the useful life of the technology, reduce its costs with higher performance and bring innovations in agriculture and architecture. The project is funded by the Horizon 2020 program of the European Union (Grant 787289).

 

 

  

Big Projects for Science and Knowledge in the International School of Science Journalism

Big Projects for Science and Knowledge in the International School of Science Journalism

Aina Crosas, from the CCS-UPF, assisted to the 10th Edition of the International School of Science Journalism. The theme of the 2019 edition of the school was “Big Projects for Science and Knowledge“.

 

The course focused on some outstanding international efforts – such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array, the Einstein Telescope, the Quantum Computing Flagship Initiative and the Future Circular Collider (FCC) – that will be at the heart of the scientific challenges of the next years and decades and motivate the work of journalists and scientific communicators for a long time.

 

As scientific knowledge increases and the boundaries of science move forward, setting increasingly ambitious and complex goals, the development of big science projects – involving hundreds or thousands of scientists from different countries and institutions and the construction of huge facilities – is becoming more and more essential for the achievement of those goals.

 

Close collaboration between scientists and science communicators is therefore more relevant than ever to ensure that information on those issues is accurate, thorough and as broad as possible.

 

The School was held from April 6th to 11th, 2019, in Erice (Sicily), Italy. The event is organised by the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture.

 

For more information, you can visit their website: http://eissjc.lnf.infn.it/

Blog your research!

Blog your research!

On Wednesday, March 20th, it was held the workshop “Blog your research“, aimed at PhD students of the UPF Biomedicine Program who carry out their research in the centers of the PRBB. The workshop, organized jointly by the DCEXS, the Science, Communication and Society Studies Center (SCS-UPF) and the PRBB, had as its main objective to provide the doctoral students with tools to explain their research to a non-expert audience.

 

In the first place Carolina Llorente and Luisa Barbosa, researchers at the SCS, offered a theoretical presentation in which they gave some advice to write posts on scientific topics in an informative format. They highlighted the importance of sharing their research with the general public and adapting the language to the readers. Some of the advice they gave focused on avoiding technical terms, using elements such as metaphors and choosing the right images. They also reviewed the organization of the text through the inverted pyramid structure.

 

After that, in the practical part, the participants began to write dissemination articles about their research. They addressed issues such as public health, neurobiology, bioinformatics or nanomedicine. In this part, they also had the support of Maruxa Martínez, from the communication department of the PRBB. In the coming days, attendees will finish completing their articles. You will be able to see the resulting articles published soon in El·lipse  and the blog Biomedia Channel!